Meet Phalesha Kyes

West Michigan Partnership for Children’s Office Administrator, Phalesha Kyes, is passionate about WMPC’s mission to create better futures for children and families through innovation and collaboration.

Inspired by her personal experience as an adoptee from the Kent County foster care system, Phalesha enjoys being part of a team that is working hard to improve the foster care system and better the lives of its more than 800 children.

“During my time at WMPC, I have seen the leaps and bounds they have taken. My hope is that this pilot is eventually turned into the WAY our foster care system is run because I honestly believe we can change lives.”

Learn more about Phalesha:

Title at WMPC: Office Administrator

Number of years you’ve worked in the nonprofit industry: 1


What is the most rewarding part about your job?
Being a part of a team that is disrupting the issues in the foster care system and having the opportunity to share WMPC’s mission through social media portals to let the world know about the amazing things we are doing.


On the flip side, what is the most challenging part about your job?
Knowing there is so much out there that still needs to be corrected or changed or improved and I cannot single-handedly (or even a part of this team) change it overnight.

As a brand new start-up, what inspired you to want to work for WMPC?
Our mission. I was in the foster care system as a child and eventually adopted so I have seen first hand the issues and flaws in the system. Knowing there was a group of people who wanted to improve it and have actually put a plan in place to do so– I knew I had to be a part of it.

What is one thing you wish people knew about foster care?
That it is not full of bad kids. It’s full of kids who may have experienced “bad situations”. They need help to express and work through situations that most people would never in their wildest dreams experience.

How has your position at WMPC and your experience in the nonprofit industry changed your perspective?
I worked for 12 years in the insurance business, so just getting an understanding of how we are funded and how we are able to exist has been an eye-opener. But I wouldn’t say my perspective has changed. My heart and passion have always been dedicated to helping those less fortunate or who may be going through a hard time in their life, and I just want to be there to help in any capacity.

What is your hope for WMPC and the Kent County foster care system?  
That we are able to build a system full of compassionate people driven towards the same goal. Social workers who are reimbursed financially for the hard work, sweat, and tears that they pour into these kids every day. Enough foster parents so children don’t have to be in residential or restrictive environments. And most of all, education for parents so the foster care system doesn’t have 800+ children in it every day.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? During my time at WMPC, I have seen the leaps and bounds they have taken. My hope is that this pilot is eventually turned into the WAY our foster care system is run because I honestly believe we can change lives.

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