Staff Spotlight: Meet Misti Conley-Rogers

West Michigan Partnership for Children’s (WMPC) Performance and Quality Improvement Coordinator, Misti Conley-Rogers, has spent the past 8 years working as a family advocate with survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, as a foster care and adoption dual worker in a private agency, and as a family preservation worker in the Families First of Michigan program.    

She is most excited to be in this role knowing the work that is being done will improve systems, policies, and programs that will directly and positively impact the children and youth in the child welfare system.

“I am happy to be a part of an agency with such an important mission, vision, and values.” 

Continue reading to learn more about Misti:

Number of years you’ve worked in the nonprofit industry: 8 years

Why you wanted to be in this field?  

I was influenced by a special social worker in my life at a young age. These experiences inspired me to become a helping professional myself, eventually leading me down the path of pursuing my bachelor’s and master’s degrees in social work. Ultimately, I desire to make the world a better place any way I can before my time is up.  

What is your role at WMPC? What are your responsibilities in this role?  

As a Performance and Quality Improvement (PQI) Coordinator at WMPC, it is my role to ensure the private child welfare agencies in Kent County have the tools and support they need to meet policy and performance guidelines to ensure the needs of youth in the child welfare system are being upheld and exceeded. As a PQI Coordinator, I will work with private child welfare agencies to assist with implementing continuous quality improvement practices with the ultimate goal of best serving the children and youth in the child welfare system in our community.  

What is the most rewarding part about your job?  

The most rewarding aspect of this role is knowing that the work we are doing to improve systems, policies, and programs will directly and positively impact the children and youth in the child welfare system. 

On the flip side, what is the most challenging part about your job? 

The most challenging aspect of this position for me will be learning new ways to feel impactful in child welfare given my move from years of direct work with children and families, to a macro position involving systemic and programmatic change. 

What inspired you to want to work for WMPC? 

My previous work with families and children involved with CPS, foster care, and adoption inspired me to view the child welfare system through a more macro systems perspective. After working at Wellspring Lutheran Services and having direct contact with WMPC, I became interested in WMPC’s role in improving the child welfare system in Kent County.  

What is one thing you wish people knew about foster care? 

I wish more people knew the ever-present need for licensed foster parents who are willing to foster youth in the child welfare system.  

How has your position at WMPC and your experience in the nonprofit industry changed your perspective? 

Since being hired at WMPC I have become more knowledgeable about the need for enhanced quality improvement practices within the child welfare system. I am gaining a deeper understanding of the gap that exists when it comes to regular quality enhancement practices in child welfare agencies.  

What is your hope for WMPC and the Kent County foster care system? 

WMPC has put an important spotlight on the racial disproportionalities that exist within the foster care system, especially in Kent County. I hope this increased awareness can bring about much needed change and reform to the child welfare system through continued discussions around this topic as well as dedicated measures to reduce racial disparities. WMPC is an important change agent and advocate for the children and families of color involved in the child welfare system. 

Is there anything else you’d like to add? 

I am happy to be a part of an agency with such an important mission, vision, and values. 

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